Poetry Reading with Francisco-Luis White
Jun
30
7:00 pm19:00

Poetry Reading with Francisco-Luis White

The first released work of poetry from White, Found Them deals with physical and spiritual place along an arduous but liberating gender and sexuality journey. This chapbook includes seventeen poems which explore transformation and departure as means of survival, as well as ancestral magic as an omnipresent resource.

Francisco-Luis White is an agender, AfroLatinx writer, poet and storyteller currently residing in District of Columbia. They have presented at the Carolina Conference on Queer Youth (2014 and 2015), Fire & Ink Conference for LGBTQ Writers of African Descent (2015), and the United States Conference on AIDS (2014). In 2015, they were recognized by National Black Justice Coalition as an SGL/LGBTQ Emerging Leader to Watch and one of Qnotes Faces of The Future. White is a contributor toTheBody.com and for HIV Equal. 

Wisdom Circle
Jul
3
3:00 pm15:00

Wisdom Circle

There are some conversations you could not have prepared for, but then you stand amazed and grateful you could be part of them.  How do those conversations happen?  In the Firelight Wisdom Circle, we will practice careful listening and clear speaking to each other.  We will invite one another to risk sharing what's most valued in our minds, hearts, and souls based on our lived experience and the wisdom of our being.

Grandparents Connect!
Jul
6
11:00 am11:00

Grandparents Connect!

Join a group created especially for Grandparents and their grandchildren! Have a cup of coffee and share ideas, anecdotes and helpful advice, as well as entertain your grandchildren in a group setting.

Each meeting will have a general theme related to the special relationship between grandchildren and grandparents as well as stories/songs for the children. 

Children's Storytime
Jul
9
10:00 am10:00

Children's Storytime

Bring your kids out for storytime! Led each month by volunteer readers from the neighborhood, your children will enjoy a reading that sparks the imagination, broadens the mind, and most of all makes us all smile and laugh.

Covert Capital - Author Event with Andrew Friedman
Jul
12
7:00 pm19:00

Covert Capital - Author Event with Andrew Friedman

The capital of the U.S. Empire after World War II was not a city. It was an American suburb. In this innovative and timely history, Andrew Friedman chronicles how the CIA and other national security institutions created a U.S. imperial home front in the suburbs of Northern Virginia. In this covert capital, the suburban landscape provided a cover for the workings of U.S. imperial power, which shaped domestic suburban life. The Pentagon and the CIA built two of the largest office buildings in the country there during and after the war that anchored a new imperial culture and social world. 
 

The Poverty Industry Author Event with Daniel Hatcher
Jul
14
7:00 pm19:00

The Poverty Industry Author Event with Daniel Hatcher

In The Poverty Industry, Daniel L. Hatcher shows us how state governments and their private industry partners are profiting from the social safety net, turning America’s most vulnerable populations into sources of revenue. The poverty industry is stealing billions in federal aid and other funds from impoverished families, abused and neglected children, and the disabled and elderly poor. As policy experts across the political spectrum debate how to best structure government assistance programs, a massive siphoning of the safety net is occurring behind the scenes.In the face of these abuses of power, Hatcher offers a road map for reforms to realign the practices of human service agencies with their intended purpose, to prevent the misuse of public taxpayer dollars, and to ensure that government aid truly gets to those in need. 

Godless Circumcisions - Author Event with Tabias Olajuawon Wilson
Jul
21
7:00 pm19:00

Godless Circumcisions - Author Event with Tabias Olajuawon Wilson

Godless Circumcisions is a witty and forceful study of race, sex and politics in contemporary culture. Personal and poetic, these essays, poems and biographical trysts disrobe issues central to the black, queer and working class existences. Wilson speaks fluently—fluctuating between academic authority, queer griot and matter-of-fact honesty—to issues of racial-sexual terror; masculine anxiety; how Black men learn the erotic, sex and vulnerability; the stereotypes of Black and BlaQueer people in the United States. Paying special attention to the costs of assimilation—or cultural circumcisions—Wilson invites the reader on his personal and political journey to a practice of critical love ethics.

 African Americans Against the Bomb - Author Event with Vincent Intondi
Aug
2
7:00 pm19:00

African Americans Against the Bomb - Author Event with Vincent Intondi

Well before Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke out against nuclear weapons, African Americans were protesting the Bomb. Historians have generally ignored African Americans when studying the anti-nuclear movement, yet they were some of the first citizens to protest Truman's decision to drop atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Now for the first time, African Americans Against the Bomb tells the compelling story of those black activists who fought for nuclear disarmament by connecting the nuclear issue with the fight for racial equality.


 The South Side Author Talk with Natalie Moore
Jun
28
7:00 pm19:00

The South Side Author Talk with Natalie Moore

Mayors Richard M. Daley and Rahm Emanuel have touted and promoted Chicago as a "world class city." The skyscrapers kissing the clouds, the billion­dollar Millennium Park, Michelin­rated restaurants, pristine lake views, fabulous shopping, vibrant theater scene, downtown flower beds and stellar architecture tell one story. Yet, swept under the rug is the stench of segregation that compromises Chicago. The Manhattan Institute dubs Chicago as one of the most segregated big cities in the country. Though other cities ­including Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Baltimore ­ can fight over that mantle, it's clear that segregation defines Chicago. And unlike many other major U.S. cities, no one race dominates. Chicago is divided equally into black, white, and Latino, each group clustered in their various turfs. 

Yoga Charity Donation Class for El Cuenco
Jun
25
1:00 pm13:00

Yoga Charity Donation Class for El Cuenco

Join this yoga class fundraiser for a chance to support the work of El Cuenco in El Salvador. 

Mt. Pleasant residents Peg and Jeff Gregson established El Cuenco in 1997 with the goal of improving the lives of impoverished people in southern El Salvador. 

The organization focuses on five primary areas: nutrition, education, health, medical, and small economic development projects.  

Your contribution will give life to the most vulnerable.

 The Mask You Live In Film Screening & Discussion
Jun
24
7:00 pm19:00

The Mask You Live In Film Screening & Discussion

The Mask You Live In follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity.

Pressured by the media, their peer group, and even the adults in their lives, our protagonists confront messages encouraging them to disconnect from their emotions, devalue authentic friendships, objectify and degrade women, and resolve conflicts through violence. These gender stereotypes interconnect with race, class, and circumstance, creating a maze of identity issues boys and young men must navigate to become “real” men.

The Mask You Live In ultimately illustrates how we, as a society, can raise a healthier generation of boys and young men.

A Chance for Change - Book Event
Jun
21
7:00 pm19:00

A Chance for Change - Book Event

In this innovative study, Crystal Sanders explores how working-class black women, in collaboration with the federal government, created the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) in 1965, a Head Start program that not only gave poor black children access to early childhood education but also provided black women with greater opportunities for political activism during a crucial time in the unfolding of the civil rights movement. 

Responding to Street Harassment 101
Jun
20
7:00 pm19:00

Responding to Street Harassment 101

Collective Action for Safe Spaces is a grassroots, volunteer-powered organization working to make public spaces safer for everyone. We train community members to respond to street harassment and be active bystanders to help promote a culture where women, LGBTQ, and gender nonconforming folks are treated with respect. Join us for a workshop to learn effective skills for responding to harassment and to intervene if you witness it!

Exoneree Diaries - Author Talk with Alison Flowers
Jun
16
7:00 pm19:00

Exoneree Diaries - Author Talk with Alison Flowers

From the front lines of the wrongful conviction capital of the United States—Cook County, Ill.—these stories reveal serious gaps in the criminal justice system. Flowers depicts the collateral damage of wrongful convictions on families and communities, challenging the deeper problem of mass incarceration in the United States. As she tells each exoneree’s powerful story, Flowers vividly shows that release from prison, though sometimes joyous and hopeful, is not a Hollywood ending—or an ending at all. Rather, an exoneree’s first unshackled steps are the beginning of a new journey full of turmoil and triumph.

Chapbook Release Party!
Jun
9
7:30 pm19:30

Chapbook Release Party!

Chapbook Release Party!
I Wanted Just to Be Soft (April 2016, Anomalous Press)
by Temim Fruchter

Featuring:

Temim Fruchter, author of I Wanted Just to Be Soft (April 2016, Anomalous Press)
Seema Reza, author of When The World Breaks Open (March 2016, Red Hen Press)
Plus, other surprises!

Come join us to celebrate the release of new work by DC writers!

The Cook Up - D. Watkins Author Talk
Jun
7
7:00 pm19:00

The Cook Up - D. Watkins Author Talk

The smartest kid on his block in East Baltimore, D. was certain he would escape the life of drugs, decadence, and violence that had surrounded him since birth. But when his brother Devin is shot-only days after D. receives notice that he's been accepted into Georgetown University—the plans for his life explode, and he takes up the mantel of his brother's crack empire. D. succeeds in cultivating the family business, but when he meets a woman unlike any he's known before, his priorities are once more put into question. Equally terrifying and hilarious, inspiring and heartbreaking, D.'s story offers a rare glimpse into the mentality of a person who has escaped many hells.

D. Watkins is a columnist for Salon; his work has been published in the New York Times, the Guardian, Rolling Stone and other publications. He is also a professor of Creative Writing at the University of Baltimore and founder ofthe BMORE Writers Project. 

Miss Representation Film Screening & Discussion
Jun
3
7:00 pm19:00

Miss Representation Film Screening & Discussion

Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Miss Representation exposes how mainstream media and culture contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America. The film draws back a curtain to reveal a glaring reality we live with every day but fail to see – how the media’s limited and often disparaging portrayals of women and girls makes it difficult for women to feel powerful and achieve leadership positions. 
 

The Politics of Staying Put - Author Talk with Carolyn Gallaher
Jun
2
7:00 pm19:00

The Politics of Staying Put - Author Talk with Carolyn Gallaher

"A semi-ethnographic examination of efforts in one U.S. city to curb gentrification by harnessing the paradoxical power of the condominium to mitigate turnover even as it generates it. The Politics of Staying Put is a deeply researched study of tenant empowerment that makes an important contribution to debates in the social sciences about displacement, neighborhood governance, and apartment living, challenging the dominant view of the condo as yuppie. Rich fieldwork and case studies illustrate how communities can — and cannot — successfully challenge the market in an era of rapid urban transformation."—Matthew Gordon Lasner, Assistant Professor, Hunter College, author of High Life: Condo Living in the Suburban Century

Carolyn Gallaher is Associate Professor in the School of International Service at American University. She is the author of On the Fault Line: Race, Class, and the American Patriot Movement, and After the Peace: Loyalist Paramilitaries in Post-accord Northern Ireland.

 Hands on the Freedom Plow - Author Panel Discussion
May
19
7:00 pm19:00

Hands on the Freedom Plow - Author Panel Discussion

Join us for an inspiring evening as we gather four contributors to Hands on the Freedom Plow Betty Garman Robinson, Judy Richardson and Jennifer Lawson in conversation about their work with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement.

 On Being Community Discussion - Who We Want to Become: Beyond the New Jim Crow
May
15
2:30 pm14:30

On Being Community Discussion - Who We Want to Become: Beyond the New Jim Crow

On Being is a Peabody Award-winning public radio conversation and podcast, and online exploration, that opens up the animating questions at the center of human life: What does it mean to be human, and how do we want to live? We explore these questions in their richness and complexity in 21st-century lives and endeavors. We pursue wisdom and moral imagination as much as knowledge; we esteem nuance and poetry as much as fact.


The Potter’s House is joining On Being in piloting local and live conversations on selected programs. On May 15th at 2:30 p.m. in the Community Room, join two Potter’s House board members in discussing Krista Tippett’s conversation, Who We Want to Become: Beyond the New Jim Crow, with Michelle Alexander. 

Base Nation - Author Event with David Vine
May
12
7:00 pm19:00

Base Nation - Author Event with David Vine

American military bases encircle the globe. More than two decades after the end of the Cold War and nearly three-quarters of a century after the last battles of World War II, the United States still stations troops at some eight hundred locations in foreign lands. These bases are usually taken for granted or overlooked entirely, a little-noticed part of the Pentagon’s vast operations. But, in an eye-opening exposé, Base Nation shows how this global base network causes an array of ills—and undermines national security in the process.

Capital Dilemma - Author Event
Apr
19
7:00 pm19:00

Capital Dilemma - Author Event

Capital Dilemma: Growth and Inequality in Washington, DC uncovers and explains the dynamics that have influenced the contemporary economic advancement of Washington, DC. This volume’s unique interdisciplinary approach using historical, sociological, anthropological, economic, geographic, political, and linguistic theories and approaches, captures the comprehensive factors related to changes taking place in one of the world’s most important cities.

Pariahs Anthology Book Event
Apr
17
3:00 pm15:00

Pariahs Anthology Book Event

The pariahs writing from outside the margins anthology shares experiences of exclusion from the writing industry based on gender, race, and stereotypes. By offering counter narratives as part of the theme “pariahs,” the writing collection and linocut prints collaboration poses as an alternative method of exposing biases in literature and exclusionary practices by academics and literae alike. The "pariah" writers redefine the literary margins and stretch past conformity and exclusivity. By including poetry, essays, prose, and diverse languages coupled with printed art, pariahs celebrates writers far beyond the common pages.

 South Side Girls - Author Talk with Marcia Chatelain
Apr
14
7:00 pm19:00

South Side Girls - Author Talk with Marcia Chatelain

In South Side Girls Marcia Chatelain recasts Chicago's Great Migration through the lens of black girls. Focusing on the years between 1910 and 1940, when Chicago's black population quintupled, Chatelain describes how Chicago's black social scientists, urban reformers, journalists and activists formulated a vulnerable image of urban black girlhood that needed protecting. She argues that the construction and meaning of black girlhood shifted in response to major economic, social, and cultural changes and crises, and that it reflected parents' and community leaders' anxieties about urbanization and its meaning for racial progress. 

Dr. Marcia Chatelain is Assistant Professor of History at Georgetown University.

 The New Community : A Conversation and Celebration
Apr
9
4:00 pm16:00

The New Community : A Conversation and Celebration

In a world constantly experiencing injustice and fear, where do we see a desire for spiritual and social transformation? Amongst urban neighborhoods undergoing rapid displacement, what forms of life and expressions of community might enable us to respond faithfully?

Together we will explore these big questions, drawing on wisdom found in the book The New Community. Written by Elizabeth O'Connor, it chronicles pivotal years in the life of The Potter's House, including the birth of Jubilee Housing and the scattering of The Church of the Saviour into smaller faith communities. The New Community was recently republished in celebration of the renovation and renewal of The Potter's House. Copies will be available for purchase, with reading groups to follow this spring.

Refreshments will be provided.

We Too Sing America - Author Talk with Deepa Iyer
Apr
5
7:00 pm19:00

We Too Sing America - Author Talk with Deepa Iyer

In We Too Sing America, nationally renowned activist Deepa Iyer catalogs recent racial flash points, from the 2012 massacre at the Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, to the violent opposition to the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and to the Park 51 Community Center in Lower Manhattan.

Iyer asks whether hate crimes should be considered domestic terrorism and explores the role of the state in perpetuating racism through detentions, national registration programs, police profiling, and constant surveillance. She looks at topics including Islamophobia in the Bible Belt; the “Bermuda Triangle” of anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim hysteria; and the energy of new reform movements, including those of “undocumented and unafraid” youth and Black Lives Matter.

In a book that reframes the discussion of race in America, a brilliant young activist provides ideas from the front lines of post-9/11 America.

Revolutionary Mothering - Book Event
Mar
31
7:00 pm19:00

Revolutionary Mothering - Book Event

Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Frontlines is an anthology that centers mothers of color and marginalized mothers’ voices – women who are in a world of necessary transformation. The challenges faced by movements working for antiviolence, anti-imperialist, and queer liberation, as well as racial, economic, reproductive, gender, and food justice are the same challenges that marginalized mothers face every day. Motivated to create spaces for this discourse because of the authors’ passionate belief in the power of a radical conversation about mothering, they have become the go-to people for cutting-edge inspired work on this topic for an overlapping committed audience of activists, scholars, and writers. Revolutionary Mothering is a movement-shifting anthology committed to birthing new worlds, full of faith and hope for what we can raise up together.

America's Original Sin - Author Talk with Jim Wallis
Mar
22
7:00 pm19:00

America's Original Sin - Author Talk with Jim Wallis

In America's Original Sin, Wallis offers a prophetic and deeply personal call to action in overcoming the racism so ingrained in American society. He speaks candidly to Christians--particularly white Christians--urging them to cross a new bridge toward racial justice and healing.
 

Stand Your Ground - Author Talk with Kelly Brown Douglas
Mar
10
7:00 pm19:00

Stand Your Ground - Author Talk with Kelly Brown Douglas

In this timely and compelling book, Kelly Brown Douglas examines the myths and narratives underlying a “stand-your-ground” culture, taking seriously the social as well as the theological questions raised by this and similar events, from Ferguson, Missouri to Staten Island, New York.
 

This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed - Author Talk with Charles Cobb
Feb
27
7:00 pm19:00

This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed - Author Talk with Charles Cobb

Visiting Martin Luther King Jr. during the Montgomery, Alabama, bus boycott, journalist William Worthy almost sat on a loaded pistol. "Just for self-defense," King assured him. It was not the only weapon King kept for such a purpose; one of his advisors remembered the reverend’s Montgomery, Alabama, home as "an arsenal." Like King, many ostensibly "nonviolent" civil rights activists embraced their constitutional right to self-protection—yet this crucial dimension of the Afro-American freedom struggle has been long ignored by history. 

Charles E. Cobb Jr. is a former field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and has taught at Brown University. An award-winning journalist, he is an inductee of the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame. Cobb lives in Jacksonville, Florida.

Unsettled - Author Talk with Eric Tang
Feb
24
7:00 pm19:00

Unsettled - Author Talk with Eric Tang

After surviving the Khmer Rouge genocide, followed by years of confinement to international refugee camps, as many as 10,000 Southeast Asian refugees arrived in the Bronx during the 1980s and ‘90s. Unsettled chronicles the unfinished odyssey of Bronx Cambodians, closely following one woman and her family for several years as they survive yet resist their literal insertion into concentrated Bronx poverty.

Eric Tang is Assistant Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies and a faculty member in the Center for Asian American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

#ItGetsBitter with DarkMatter
Feb
20
7:00 pm19:00

#ItGetsBitter with DarkMatter

DarkMatter is a trans south asian performance art duo comprised of Alok Vaid-Menon and Janani Balasubramanian. Based in New York City, DarkMatter regularly performs to sold-out houses at venues like La MaMa Experimental Theater, The Brooklyn Museum, and the Asian American Writer’s Workshop. DarkMatter was recently part of the Public Theater’s Under the Radar Festival, the Lincoln Center’s La Casita Festival, as well as the Queer International Arts Festival. Known for their quirky aesthetic and political panache, DarkMatter has been invited to perform at stages across the world.

Women & Socialism - Author Talk with Sharon Smith
Feb
4
7:00 pm19:00

Women & Socialism - Author Talk with Sharon Smith

Join a discussion with Sharon Smith that takes up issues of women’s oppression from a Marxist perspective — focusing on the centrality of race and class — amid the stirrings of a new movement today.

Sharon Smith is the author of Subterranean Fire: A History of Working-Class Radicalism in the United States, also published by Haymarket books, as well as many articles on women's liberation and the U.S. working class. Her writings appear regularly in Socialist Worker newspaper and the International Socialist Review.

Knocking The Hustle - Author Talk with Lester K. Spence
Jan
21
7:00 pm19:00

Knocking The Hustle - Author Talk with Lester K. Spence

In Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics, Lester K. Spence writes the first book length effort to chart the effects of the Neoliberal transformation on African American communities, in an attempt to revitalize the black political imagination. Rather than asking black men and women to “hustle harder” Spence criticizes the act of hustling itself as a tactic used to demobilize and disempower the communities most in need of empowerment.

 

Lester K. Spence is Associate Professor of political science and Africana studies at Johns Hopkins University. He specializes in the study of black, racial, and urban politics in the wake of the neoliberal turn. An award winning scholar (in 2013, he received the W.E.B. DuBois Distinguished Book Award for his book, Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip-hop and Black Politics) and teacher (in 2009, he received an Excellence in Teaching Award), he can regularly be heard on National Public Radio and the Marc Steiner Show.

 

$2.00 A Day - Author Talk with Kathryn J. Edin
Jan
14
7:00 pm19:00

$2.00 A Day - Author Talk with Kathryn J. Edin

A revelatory account of poverty in America so deep that we, as a country, don’t think it exists.

After two decades of brilliant research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn’t seen since the mid-1990s — households surviving on virtually no income. Edin teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on calculating incomes of the poor, to discover that the number of American families living on $2.00 per person, per day, has skyrocketed to 1.5 million American households, including about 3 million children. 

 

 Resisting LNG Exports from Dominion Cove Point
Jan
7
7:00 pm19:00

Resisting LNG Exports from Dominion Cove Point

Dominion Resources is constructing a dangerous liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility in Southern Maryland. This LNG terminal would export to India and Japan natural gas that is produced by fracking in the Marcellus Shale and transported by several pipelines that are being resisted across the mid-Atlantic. Along with worsening the major health risks to communities and environmental destruction caused by the fracking industry, Dominion Cove Point poses a catastrophic heath and safety threat to the rural community living on and around the beautiful Cove Point peninsula on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay. The fight to stop this project is on!